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Ask a Speechie – You’re a Speech Pathologist, so you work with children who stutter, right?

May 30, 2019
Ask a Speechie – You’re a Speech Pathologist, so you work with children who stutter, right?

You’re a Speech Pathologist, so you work with children who stutter, right?

This month’s question is answered by our Speech Pathologist Natasha Kolivas.

When I asked our team of Speech Pathologists what question they get asked the most, this one was a clear winner! What does a Speech Pathologist actually do? When people hear the title ‘Speech Pathologist’, many will automatically think of someone who works with people that stutter, but this is only one of the many areas in which Speech Pathologists provide assessment and intervention.

All Speech Pathologists in Australia are required to complete tertiary-level education in a course recognised and accredited by Speech Pathology Australia, the governing body for Speech Pathologists in Australia. Through this training, Speech Pathologists are taught the most current and up-to-date assessment and intervention methods to diagnose and treat a large range of communication and swallowing impairments in both adults and children. This includes, but is not limited to, difficulties with:

  • Speech – difficulties producing specific speech sounds, which impact on an individual’s ability to produce intelligible speech
  • Language – difficulties using expressive and receptive language, which impacts on an individual’s ability to use and understand language , respectively
  • Literacy – difficulties with phonological and phonemic awareness, which impacts on an individual’s ability to read and spell
  • Voice – difficulties with respiration, phonation, and resonance, which impact on an individual’s ability to produce a clear voice
  • Fluency – difficulties with continuity, smoothness, rate, and effort of speech production, which impact on an individual’s ability to produce clear speech
  • Swallowing – difficulties manipulating food appropriately in the mouth, which impacts on an individual’s ability to safely swallow
  • Social Communication – difficulties using pragmatic language and social skills, which impacts on an individual’s ability to form and maintain meaningful relationships with others

Speech Pathologists are also taught how to seek-out and critically evaluate research, in order to determine the best, evidence-based methods with which to provide therapy. This allows Speech Pathologists to continually improve the services they offer, in line with current best-practice methods.

If you would like more information about the many different roles of a Speech Pathologist, please click here.

Alternatively, if you would like to find out how a Speech Pathologist can add value to your child’s support team, please contact the Practice on 9890 1062 and ask to speak to a Speech Pathologist.